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Peter’s week: life as an Upper Primary student

Photo essay by former volunteer, Rachel McLaren.
Monday morning: Mt Meru towers over Peter and his friends as they walk from the Moivaro boarding campus to St Jude’s Upper Primary campus. They’ve got a lot to catch up on after all spending the weekend with their families.
Monday morning: Mt Meru towers over Peter and his friends as they walk from the Moivaro boarding campus to St Jude’s Upper Primary campus. They’ve got a lot to catch up on after all spending the weekend with their families.
Monday morning at school: Peter reads to his classmates
Monday morning at school: Peter reads to his classmates
Lunch time! Peter and his friends in the Upper Primary dining hall. Tuesday’s lunch is ugali and beans.
Lunch time! Peter and his friends in the Upper Primary dining hall. Tuesday’s lunch is ugali and beans.
Each day after lunch, Peter plays in the school yard with his friends.
Each day after lunch, Peter plays in the school yard with his friends.
Tuesday afternoon is Peter’s library session. His favourite book is Fire Mountain.
Tuesday afternoon is Peter’s library session. His favourite book is Fire Mountain.
Each day after school, Peter and his friends return to the Moivaro Boarding Campus after a busy day. Peter shares a boarding room with 5 other boys. They take pride in keeping their room tidy.
Each day after school, Peter and his friends return to the Moivaro Boarding Campus after a busy day. Peter shares a boarding room with 5 other boys. They take pride in keeping their room tidy.
Peter's tidy bunk
Peter’s tidy bunk.
Wednesday is washing day! Peter washes his school uniform...
Wednesday is washing day! Peter washes his school uniform…
...and hangs it on the line.
…and hangs it on the line.
Even with chores, Peter has plenty of time to study and play.
Even with chores, Peter has plenty of time to study and play.
On Friday afternoon Peter rides the school bus home to his family.
On Friday afternoon Peter rides the school bus home to his family.
Peter enjoys time with his father, siblings, and mother on the weekends. They live in a house consisting of three small rooms made of mud and wood, lined on the inside with cardboard and with a single electric light in each.
Peter enjoys time with his father, siblings, and mother on the weekends. They live in a house consisting of three small rooms made of mud and wood, lined on the inside with cardboard and with a single electric light in each.
The first room, adorned with pictures of Christ and Bob Marley, has only just enough room for a couch and a small table where they cook and eat meals.
The first room, adorned with pictures of Christ and Bob Marley, has only just enough room for a couch and a small table where they cook and eat meals.
On Saturday Peter finds time to study on the single bed he shares with his two brothers.
On Saturday Peter finds time to study on the single bed he shares with his two brothers.
Washing is done outside in buckets that they fill with water from a tap that is a few metres from their house.
Washing is done outside in buckets that they fill with water from a tap that is a few metres from their house.
The room where Peter's parents sleep; their worldly possessions are stacked in the little space there is around their bed and their clothes hang from the ceiling.
The room where Peter’s parents sleep; their worldly possessions are stacked in the little space there is around their bed and their clothes hang from the ceiling.
When Peter is home he tutors his brothers who attend a local government school, helps his parents with chores, reads and plays with his neighbours.
When Peter is home he tutors his brothers who attend a local government school, helps his parents with chores, reads and plays with his neighbours.
Poverty and wealth come in many forms. Peter is a part of a family and community on whom he can rely on for love, support and friendship, in this regard he is extremely wealthy. However, in terms of standard of living, healthcare and opportunity for quality education and employment, Peter and his family are lacking. This is true for many other Tanzanians and is the reason that The School of St. Jude was set up with the mission of fighting poverty through education.
Poverty and wealth come in many forms. Peter is a part of a family and community on whom he can rely on for love, support and friendship, in this regard he is extremely wealthy. However, in terms of standard of living, healthcare and opportunity for quality education and employment, Peter and his family are lacking. This is true for many other Tanzanians and is the reason that The School of St. Jude was set up with the mission of fighting poverty through education.

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Keep in mind that parcels sent by airmail can take up to four months to get here (sea mail is even longer – often 12+ months!), so don’t worry if it takes a while for us to let you know the parcel has arrived.